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Small Forest Stream, Huallaga River Floodplain, Peru

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Peru, Loreto, Yurimaguas

The Huallaga River is a tributary of the Marañón River, part of the Amazon Basin. Old names for this river include Guallaga and Rio de los Motilones.

The Huallaga is born on the slopes of the Andes in central Peru and joins the Marañón before the latter reaches the Ucayali River to form the Amazon.

Its main affluents are the Monzón, Mayo, Biabo, Abiseo and Tocache rivers. Coca is grown in most of those valleys, which are also exposed to periodic floods.

Submitted by
Arif Hikmet
Approved by
Heiko Blessin & Nathan K. Lujan
GPS
-5.9054799, -76.3217621
Geographical region
South America
Drainage Basin
Ucayali river
River catchment
Huallaga river
Water body type
Puddle
Water body name
Floodplain Small Forest stream
Water body part
Marsh land
Water body course
Lower course
Water body: tributary of
Hill streams
Tributary name
Huallaga river

Videos above and below water

Water Chemistry

Water information

Water type
Fresh water
Water color
Mixed water
Water transparency
Medium
Concentration of sediments
Medium
Water temperature
25 °C
Water flow/curent
Slow

Chemical parameters

pH
6.5
Conductivity
80
GH
3 mg/l
KH
1 mg/l
Dissolved Oxygen

Substrate in nature

Sand
White
Pebble/Gravel
no
Stone
no
Stone form
Silt/Mud
Leaves
Many
Driftwood
Many
Submerged terrestrial vegetation

Aquatic Biotope

Date of collecting
Collecting area
Water depth
Air temperature
Sunlight

Environment

Environment
Affected by human activity
Affected by human activity
Agriculture
Agriculture
Little
Surrounding area

Although it runs for 700 miles (1,100 km), it remains unnavigable for most part.[2] For nearly its entire length the Huallaga is an impetuous torrent running through a succession of gorges.

It has forty-two rapids (pongos) and it crosses the Andes, forming the Pongo de Aguirre gorge. From this point, 140 miles (230 km) from the Amazon, the Huallaga can be ascended by larger river boats (lanchas) to the port city of Yurimaguas, Loreto.

Although there are no defined boundaries, the river is commonly divided into two or three sections. From the town of Tocache in San Martin to the source of the river is generally referred to as the Upper Huallaga.

Regions of the river are also referred to as central Huallaga (usually from Tocache or Juanjui to Chazuta), and the lower Huallaga (usually from Chazuta to Yurimaguas where the Huallaga meets the Marañon).

These divisions are for general reference, and are independent of the “highland” and “lowland” jungle regions of the Amazon Rainforest.

Underwater landscape

The Huallaga River flows relatively above 1000 meters above sea level. Forest streams are covered with a layer of white sand that is poor in minerals.

Small streams feature blackwater. It is a weak area in terms of aquatic flora. There are abundant stranded driftwood, wood and leaf deposits on the

 

FIshes:

  • Paracheirodon innesi 6
  • Apistogramma beanschi 2

Plants:

  • Pistia stratiotes
Threats to ecology

The river and the riversides suffer point source pollution, utilized as an interminable garbage dump. At least one chute for garbage trucks is installed.

The Huallaga River supports a myriad of wildlife and vegetation. The river is especially rich in amphibian life. A total of 18 species of frogs have been recorded from it, including the Prostherapis femoralis, Phyllodromus pulchellus and Dendrobates reticulatus.

Riparian zone

Trees near the aquatic habitat
Many -

Sitography

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