bin

Shallow intermediate habitat, Cape Banza, DRC

Sponsored by

Congo, the Democratic Republic of the, Fizi, Ubwari Peninsula

Located on the Ubwari Peninsula in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Cape Banza (4°04’88.9″S 29°24’23.9″E) is one of the regions with the lowest anthropogenic impact on the entire coast of Lake Tanganyika. With very low population density (0.5 people/km2; DRC 1988), there are no roads. Watersheds are small, limiting sediment discharge.

Since the discovery of sub-lacustrine hydrothermal fields at Cape Banza, along the western arm of the East African Rift, in the late 1980s, the region has suffered from the ecological threat of hydrocarbon exploration. Currently, the Ubwari Peninsula region is involved in armed clashes. Photographic records and videos are extremely rare.

Cabo Banza is characterized by a rocky coastline, typically made of sandstone, which extends downhill to an average depth of 4 meters and the intercalated bottom of rocks and sand in the shallow regions. By choosing this region, I hope I can help with awareness and preservation.

Submitted by
Marcus Vinicius David
Approved by
Ad Konings & Stefano Valdesalici
GPS
-4.0498838, 29.2423897
Geographical region
Central Africa
Drainage Basin
Northern basin of the Lake Tanganyika
River catchment
Water body type
Lake
Water body name
Lake Tanganyika
Water body part
Open water
Water body course
Water body: tributary of
Tributary name

Videos above and below water

Water Chemistry

Water information

Water type
Fresh water
Water color
Clear water
Water transparency
High
Concentration of sediments
Low
Water temperature
26-28 °C
Water flow/curent
Strong

Chemical parameters

pH
9.1
Conductivity
650
GH
224 mg/l
KH
340 mg/l
Dissolved Oxygen

Substrate in nature

Sand
Beige
Pebble/Gravel
Beige
Stone
Mixed
Stone form
Irregular
Silt/Mud
None
Leaves
Few
Driftwood
Few
Submerged terrestrial vegetation

Aquatic Biotope

Date of collecting
Collecting area
Water depth
Air temperature
Sunlight

Environment

Environment
Untouched
Surrounding area

Cape Banza is located in the far north of the Ubwari Peninsula, in the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, in East Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo. The Ubwari peninsula is delineated by two geological faults.

Underwater landscape

A rocky shoreline.

Fishes: 

  • Xenotilapia leptura (Boulenger, 1901), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Cyathopharynx furcifer (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Eretmodus marksmithi (Burgess, 2012), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Limnotilapia dardennii (Boulenger, 1899), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Ophthalmotilapia nasuta (Poll & Matthes, 1962), Cichlidae: <2% of population at sit
  • Ophthalmotilapia ventralis (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Petrochromis ephippium (Brichard, 1989), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Petrochromis famula (Matthes & Trewavas, 1960), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Petrochromis fasciolatus (Boulenger, 1914), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Petrochromis orthognathus (Matthes, 1959), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Pseudosimochromis curvifrons (Poll, 1942), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Pseudosimochromis marginatus (Poll, 1956), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Spathodus marlieri (Poll, 1950), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Telmatochromis dhonti (Boulenger, 1919), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Telmatochromis temporalis (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: 5–10% of population
  • Tropheus moorii (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Altolamprologus compressiceps (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Aulonocranus dewindti (Boulenger, 1899), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Chalinochromis brichardi (Poll, 1974), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Chrysichthys brachynema (Boulenger, 1900), Claroteidae: <2% of population at site
  • Julidochromis marlieri (Poll, 1956), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Julidochromis transcriptus (Matthes, 1959), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lamprologus callipterus (Boulenger, 1906), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lobochilotes labiatus (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Neolamprologus furcifer (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Neolamprologus leleupi (Poll, 1956), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Neolamprologus mondabu (Boulenger, 1906), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Neolamprologus tretocephalus (Boulenger, 1899), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site each
  • Neolamprologus toae (Poll, 1949), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Synodontis dhonti (Boulenger, 1917), Mochokidae: <2% of population at site
  • Synodontis multipunctatus (Boulenger, 1898), Mochokidae: <2% of population at site
  • Synodontis petricola (Matthes, 1959), Mochokidae: <2% of population at site
  • Xenotilapia flavipinnis (Poll, 1985), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Xenotilapia sima (Boulenger, 1899), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lamprichthys tanganicanus (Boulenger, 1898), Poeciliidae: <2% of population at site
  • Neolamprologus brichardi (Poll, 1974), Cichlidae: >10% of population
  • Neolamprologus multifasciatus (Boulenger, 1906), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Neolamprologus savoryi (Poll, 1949), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Telmatochromis bifrenatus (Myers, 1936), Cichlidae: >10% of population
  • Cyprichromis microlepidotus (Poll, 1956), Cichlidae: 5–10% of population
  • Xenotilapia tenuidentata (Poll, 1951), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Neolamprologus calliurus (Boulenger, 1906), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Paracyprichromis brieni (Poll, 1981), Cichlidae: 2–5% of population
  • Paracyprichromis nigripinnis (Boulenger, 1901), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Mastacembelus ellipsifer (Boulenger, 1899), Mastacembelidae: <2% of population at site
  • Mastacembelus moorii (Boulenger, 1898), Mastacembelidae: <2% of population at site
  • Cyphotilapia frontosa (Boulenger, 1906), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lamprologus lemairii (Boulenger, 1899), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lepidiolamprologus attenuatus (Steindachner, 1909), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lepidiolamprologus cunningtoni (Boulenger, 1906), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lepidiolamprologus elongatus (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Lepidiolamprologus profundicola (Poll, 1949), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Neolamprologus fasciatus (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Perissodus microlepis (Boulenger, 1898), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site
  • Plecodus straeleni (Poll, 1948), Cichlidae: <2% of population at site

Crustacean:

  • Candonopsis depressa, Candonidae: <2% of population at site
  • Allocypria aberrans, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Allocypria claviformis, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Allocypria humilis, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Mecynocypria cf. conoidea, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Mecynocypria deflexa, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Mecynocypria emaciata, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Mecynocypria opaca, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Mecynocypria subangulata, Cyclocyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Cypridopsis obliquata, Cyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Cypridopsis serrata, Cyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Tanganyikacypridopsis acanthodes, Cyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Tanganyikacypridopsis calcarata, Cyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Tanganyikacypridopsis depressa, Cyprididae: <2% of population at site each
  • Archaeocyprideis tuberculata, Cytherideidae: <2% of population at site
  • Mesocyprideis irsacae, Cytherideidae: >10% of population
  • Romecytheridea ampla, Cytherideidae: 5–10% of population each
  • Romecytherideatenuisculpta, Cytherideidae: 5–10% of population each
  • Tanganyikacythere burtonensis, Cytherideidae: <2% of population at site
  • Tanganyikacythere caljoni, Cytherideidae: 2–5% of population
  • Gomphocythere alata, Limnocytheridae: 5–10% of population
  • Gomphocythere cristata, Limnocytheridae: <2% of population at site
  • Gomphocythere curta, Limnocytheridae: >10% of population

Mollusc:

  • Caelatura burtoni, Unionidae: 2–5% of population
  • Mutela spekei, Mutelidae:<2% of population at site
  • Anceya giraudi, Thiaridae:>10% of population
  • Bridouxia giraudi, Thiaridae: 2–5% of population
  • Bridouxia Ponsonbyi, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Bridouxia sp., Thiaridae: 5–10% of population
  • Lavigeria sp. “fine striped”, Thiaridae: >10% of population
  • Lavigeria grandis, Thiaridae: 2–5% of population
  • Lavigeria cf. nassa “fine ribbed”, Thiaridae: 5–10% of population
  • Lavigeria cf. nassa “small fine”, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Lavigeria cf. paucicostata “coarse ribbed”, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Lavigeria cf. paucicostata “sand lav”, Thiaridae: 5–10% of population
  • Lavigeria cf. paucicostata “spiny”, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Mysorelloides multisulcata, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Paramelania damoni form: crassigranulata, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Paramelania damoni form: imperialis, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site).
  • Reymondia horei, Thiaridae: >10% of population
  • Spekia sp. “coheni”, Thiaridae: 2–5% of population
  • Stanleya neritinoides, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Stormsia minima, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site
  • Syrnolopsis minuta, Thiaridae: <2% of population at site

Plants: 

  • Typha capensis (Typhaceae)
  • Typha domingensis (Typhaceae)
  • Vossia cuspidata (Poaceae)
  • Cyperus papyrus (Cyperaceae)
  • Phragmites australis (Poaceae)
  • Eichhornia crassipes (Pontederiaceae)
  • Pistia stratiotes (Araceae)
  • Azolla filiculoides (Azollaceae)
  • Lemna spp. (Lemnaceae)
  • Salvinia molesta (Salviniaceae)
  • Hydrilla verticillate (Hydrocharitaceae)
  • Ceratophyllum demersum (Ceratophyllaceae)
  • Potamogeton spp. (Potamogetonaceae)
  • Vallisneria spiralis (Hydrocharitaceae)
Threats to ecology

The main threat is oil exploration.

Riparian zone

Trees near the aquatic habitat
Many -

Bibliography

Comment by the expert

Ad Konings: Criteria #3 – Very extensive list of species although many have never been reported from Cape Banza. Criteria #4 – Perfect! Criteria #5 – I’m certain that the fishes can live “harmoniously” together for a long time but one of the three species does not occur anywhere near Cape Banza, i.e. N. multifasciatus only occurs in the southernmost part of the lake mainly in Zambia. The title of a the biotope is “Shallow intermediate habitat”, but none of the three species occur in such habitat. N. leleupi occurs in pure rocky habitats (only black morph at Banza) at depths below 15 m and L. ocellatus is mostly found below 5m on sandy/muddy bottoms without rocks and certainly no plants.

Stefano Valdesalici: Perfect biogeography!