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#5737 Corrientes, Paraná flooded savanna, Argentina

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Argentina, Corrientes, Corrientes

The Paraná River originates in central South America, from the southeastern plateau of Brazil, joins the Uruguay River and empties into the Atlantic Ocean through the Rio de la Plata Estuary. It is the longest river on the continent after the Amazon.

The length of the river is 4,880 km, its basin is 2.582,672 km², and the annual average flow is 17,290 m³/s. The catchment covers most of southeastern Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina.

It takes the name Upper Parana from its source to the junction with the Uruguay River. It is formed by the union of the Upper Parana Grand and Paranaíba tributaries. Flowing south, it receives the Tiete, Paranapanema and Iguaçu rivers on the right. After taking the Iguazu River, it forms the Brazil-Paraguay border and later the Argentina-Paraguay border.

Apistogramma borelli, a species that I love very much, lives in the region. This area, which is a flat and wide savanna, hosts small ponds along with the Parana River floods. Its waters are cool and partially rich in minerals. Meadow plants are abundant in the region; Such as Helanthium tenellum, Pontederia and Eleocharis sp.

Submitted by
Arif Hikmet Başeğmez
GPS
-27.4659805, -58.7140160
Geographical region
South America
Drainage Basin
Parana River
River catchment
Parana River
Water body type
Wetland
Water body name
Parana river flood pond
Water body part
Flood plain
Water body course
Upper course
Water body: tributary of
Wetland
Tributary name
Parana River

Videos above and below water

Water Chemistry

Water information

Water type
Fresh water
Water color
Clear water
Water transparency
High
Concentration of sediments
Low
Water temperature
25 °C
Water flow/curent
Slow

Chemical parameters

pH
6.5
Conductivity
180
GH
8 mg/l
KH
4 mg/l
Dissolved Oxygen

Substrate in nature

Sand
White
Pebble/Gravel
Mixed
Stone
Mixed
Stone form
Silt/Mud
Brown
Leaves
Few
Driftwood
Few
Submerged terrestrial vegetation
Yes

Aquatic Biotope

Date of collecting
Collecting area
Water depth
Air temperature
Sunlight

Environment

Environment
Affected by human activity
Affected by human activity
Pollution
Pollution
Little
Surrounding area

The Paraná River originates in central South America, from the southeastern plateau of Brazil, joins the Uruguay River, and empties into the Atlantic Ocean through the Rio de la Plata Estuary. It is the longest river on the continent after the Amazon.

The length of the river is 4,880 km, its basin is 2.582,672 km², and the annual average flow is 17,290 m³/s. The catchment covers most of southeastern Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina.

It takes the name Upper Parana from its source to the junction with the Uruguay River. It is formed by the union of the Upper Parana Grand and Paranaíba tributaries. Flowing south, it receives the Tiete, Paranapanema, and Iguaçu rivers on the right. After taking the Iguazu River, it forms the Brazil-Paraguay border and later the Argentina-Paraguay border.

The Iguazu River separates the Argentina-Brazil-Paraguay countries from each other in the area where it joins with Parana. Before merging with the Parana River, it forms the Iguazú Falls.

Underwater landscape

In the rainy season, rising waters cover the Corrientes savannas. The ground is covered with flooded meadows and dry grass. It forms a brown soil or white fine sand substrate. The water is clean and clear. In times of flood, dry leaves and dry branches are carried to the ponds with the floods.

Threats to ecology

Currently, the Paraná River ecosystem suffers from harmful effects triggered by indiscriminately exploitative human activities. Construction projects that build dams and other artificial barriers along the Paraná River have done irreparable damage to the river’s ecosystems.

During the construction of the Itaipu Hydroelectric Dam in Paraná in 1979, the Guairá Falls completely drowned in the process of creating the dam. Such dams and waterways have also affected the aquatic and terrestrial habitats of native flora and fauna, as they endanger the migration routes of fish and even displace thousands of local people. Rapid deforestation along the riverbanks for agricultural expansion has contributed to the erosion of the land. as a result, large amounts of eroded sediment and debris are loaded into the river and the quality of Paraná’s water resources is degraded.

About 88% of the original area of ​​the Atlantic Forest around the Paraná River has been lost, compromising the existence of much of the region’s native flora and fauna. A scientific report claims that around 50% of fish species in Paraná are devastated in just 20 years. An important species of the Paraná River ecosystem and an important link in the food chain, Sábalo is also weakened by exploitative fishing. Unfortunately, these fishermen do not realize that with their irresponsible practices, they are not only seriously damaging the ecosystem.

Riparian zone

Trees near the aquatic habitat
Few -