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Cape Kaku, Lake Tanganyika, Zambia

Sponsored by

Zambia, District of Mpulungu, Kasaba Bay

The chosen biotope is located in the Southwest part in the coastline belonging to Zambia, more specifically Cape Kaku. Cape Kaku is a small piece of land that juts out into the lake and that the characteristics of the topography of the coast, just a few meters down and the clarity of its waters make it a very special place for diving in an aquarium natural. As in other parts of the lake, here we find huge rocky outcrops, which like marine reefs are home to a diverse community of fish.

We also found piles of rocks zones of small and medium size where smaller species thrive exploit any crack to lay their eggs.

Near here is the Kasaba Bay, where wild catches eventually reach the shops around the world. It is within the limits of Sumbu National Park, in a sparsely populated area of Zambia.

Submitted by
Marco Antonio Cunha
Approved by
Ad Konings & Michael Salter
GPS
-8.6413937, 30.8684940
Geographical region
Eastern Africa
Drainage Basin
Lake Tanganyika
River catchment
Water body type
Lake
Water body name
Tanganyika
Water body part
Water body course
Water body: tributary of
Tributary name

Videos above and below water

Water Chemistry

Water information

Water type
Fresh water
Water color
Clear water
Water transparency
High
Concentration of sediments
Water temperature
24-28 °C
Water flow/curent
Slow

Chemical parameters

pH
8.8
Conductivity
550
GH
200 mg/l
KH
300 mg/l
Dissolved Oxygen

Substrate in nature

Sand
Beige
Pebble/Gravel
no
Stone
Grey
Stone form
Irregular
Silt/Mud
Beige
Leaves
no
Driftwood
no
Submerged terrestrial vegetation
no

Aquatic Biotope

Date of collecting
Collecting area
Water depth
Air temperature
Sunlight

Environment

Environment
Affected by human activity
Affected by human activity
Pollution
Pollution
Little
Surrounding area

The chosen biotope is located in the southwestern part of the rocky coast belonging to Zambia, more specifically Cape Kaku, a small piece of land that juts out into the lake and that features the topography of the coast a few meters below and the clarity of its waters make it a very special place to dive in a natural aquarium.

It is within the limits of Sumbu National Park, in a sparsely populated area of Zambia.

Underwater landscape

The intermediate habitat consists of sandy bottom with numerous rocks which provide shelter for the species-rich community. The rocky part can cover up to three quarters of the sandy bottom.

The most important characteristic is the gradual inclination of the bottom. The biocover on the rocks is usually overlaid with a thin layer of fine sand. There is no real depth restriction for this habitat, but it is most heavily populated between 5 and 40 meters. The intermediate habitat harbours the most species rich communities of the lake.

Fish:

  • Altolamprologus calvus
  • Altolamprologus compressiceps
  • Callochromis macrops
  • Chalinochromis brichardi
  • Cyathopharynx furcifer
  • Cyphotilapiaosa gibberosa
  • Cyprichromis sp.
  • Cunningtonia longiventralis
  • Enantiopus melanogenys
  • Eretmodus cyanostictus
  • Julidochromis regani
  • Lamprologus ocellatus
  • Lepidiolamprologus elongatus
  • Lepidiolamprologus kendalli
  • Neolamprologus buescheri
  • Neolamprologus multifasciatus
  • Neolamprologus pulcher
  • Neolamprologus sexfasciatus
  • Ophthalmotilapia ventralis
  • Petrochromis ephippium
  • Petrochromis fasciolatus
  • Tropheus moorii
  • Variabilichromis moorii
  • Xenotilapia singularis
  • Xenotilapia sp.

Mollusc:

  • Neothauma tanganyicense

Aquatic plants:

  • None
Threats to ecology

Pollution, overexploitation and sedimentation are some of the problems that threaten the diversity of species in this vast African lake.

Industrial and domestic waste from towns and villages located on the coast are discharged into this water. Ferries and fishermen, who use generator oil and night lights for fishing, also pollute the lake.

Riparian zone

Trees near the aquatic habitat
Many -